Trojans

trojans A trojan horse malware is a type of software than deploys malicious code after installation of a host program. It could be a small freeware application that actually works, and may work well and be a great alternative to an expensive software. However, inside the working freeware is a trojan which deploys during install of the host application, and then does the dirty work.
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The term comes from a Greek tale of an attacking Greek army building a great wooden horse. They pretended to leave the war and left the wheeled horse. The horse was wheeled into the Trojan camp as a sign of victory, but unknowingly housed many Greek elite soldiers. These troops emerged from the horse and attacked the surprised and vulnerable enemy. Today, the horse is typically some kind of software the user is happy to receive. After installing the software, the payload executes, much like the attacking Greek army. Thus, the trojan horse is now a common problem on today's PCs.

These trojans are particularly difficult to curtail, due to many users' insistence to blindly install freeware. Users have to make a determined effort to scan and check all software before installing it.

We recommend using a capable trojan scanner and remover regularly, and in particular, scanning software before installing it. These scanners can even run normally on your PC to alert you of any trojans before installing downloaded files. If you suspect you have a trojan on your computer, get started with our step-by-step spyware remover software guide right away.

Trojan News

Mobile App Attacks: No Malware, No Problem Traditional attack methods, like those used with the recent mobile online banking Trojan Svpeng, involve the installation of malware on the device to steal information and commit fraud. However, new techniques are emerging that would enable an attacker to compromise a device and steal private information from the owner -- for example, the typical copycat app on a third-party app store.

Chinese Linux Trojan makes the jump to Windows DDoS attacks largely aimed within China

Mystery 'Onion/Critroni' ransom Trojan evolves to use more sophisticated encryption Kaspersky Lab has added more detail on the fiendish ‘Onion’ (aka 'Critroni') ransom Trojan that uses the Tor anonymity service to hide its command and control (C&C) as well as displaying a level of thoughtfulness about its encryption design that bodes ill for future attacks.